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Posts Tagged ‘women’s literary cafe’

Today is a special TeaserTrain Thursday – the WLC is hosting a SUPERSONIC TeaserTrain where you can check out all the books at once. Be sure to also search the #teasertrain tag on Twitter to see all the books and links to their excerpts, including my excerpt from COME THE SHADOWS and the one I hosted here – Sheila R. Lamb’s ONCE UPON A GODDESS.

Enjoy the reads! If you decide to purchase some of the books there are special offers to receive some free books too!

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Today we welcome S.L. Pierce, author of The Devil’s Game. She is participating in a Women’s Literary Cafe launch for Andy Hollowman’s debut novel: Shades of Gray.

Your website says “Mystery/Thrillers without all the Prose.” Can you explain a bit about the philosophy behind that?

The main character of The Devil’s Game is Rachel Pendleton.  She is young, about to finish graduate school, and really looking forward to starting her ‘real’ life.  But just when everything is about to be perfect in her eyes, someone starts stalking her and she doesn’t know who to trust.  But before you think ‘another stalker book’ the difference here is this question; what if a stalker had a stalker?  My favorite part of writing her was trying to keep her strong but mixing in the right amount of fear.  It was really challenging.

Tell us about your main character The Devil’s Game. What’s your favorite part about writing her?

The main character of The Devil’s Game is Rachel Pendleton. She is young, about to finish graduate school, and really looking forward to starting her ‘real’ life. But just when everything is about to be perfect in her eyes, someone starts stalking her and she doesn’t know who to trust. But before you think ‘another stalker book’ the difference here is this question; what if a stalker had a stalker? My favorite part of writing her was trying to keep her strong but mixing in the right amount of fear. It was really challenging.

Is she reflection of you in all or part?

Rachel is not a reflection of me at all but I know my co-writer drew on her experience with her two grown daughters to help shape Rachel.

Did you pull in any real-life events?

Oh no, thank goodness. Everything in this story is complete fiction.

I have to ask one of the most popular (and to me, intriguing) questions – are you a panster or a plotter when you write?

Definitely a plotter. I wrote Secrets (my first book) as a panster and had to do so much rewriting to make all the plot points fit together. The problem with pansting, for me, is if you think of something halfway through, you have to go back and make it work throughout the book. So much more work. So now I plot, plot, plot before ever writing a word.

Do you stick to your plot or do you still find yourself changing things once you begin to write the story?

I plot the big picture so there is plenty of room for small things to change. It would be crazy NOT to listen to the voices in my head, right 🙂

You’ve been publishing for almost a year now, both by yourself and with a writing partner – do you still find new things to learn about the process of writing and publishing your work?

Absolutely. I feel like such a beginner when it comes to the writing. The good thing is, everything I write gets easier and easier. Less revisions, less rewriting and I’m figuring out the method of writing that works best for me (set a timer and turn off my internal critic). But there is so much to learn and I hope to always be getting better. As far as the publishing, I feel I have the publishing/advertising stuff down now. Which doesn’t mean I am always following through. But I know what I should be doing.

Did you ever consider pursuing the traditional publishing route?

Not really. When I started writing self publishing was turning the corner of acceptance and a lot of things made sense to me – things like keeping the rights, keeping control, and keeping most of the royalties instead of just a small percentage. I still feel self publishing is the right path for me.

What do you feel are the greatest strengths and challenges of being an indie writer?

The strengths are the things I listed above, keeping rights, keeping control. You can write the story YOU want. But with that comes the challenge of having no one guiding you if you get off track. And editing, cover art, and promoting are all up to you and they take a lot of time away from writing. But if you can find a balance, it is really worth it.

What would you say to someone who is considering purchasing an indie book?

I would say forget about all the reviewers and detractors. If a book looks interesting download a sample or read the ‘look inside’ section. It’s free, it’s easy, and you’ll know right away if the book is something you want to read. I’d say give them a chance.wearing. So when I write, I leave most of that out, and just focus on the mystery and the action. It does make the stories shorter, but they end up with a really fast pace.

 S.L. Pierce spent ten years getting a PhD in engineering before deciding engineering wasn’t for her. She now lives in Colorado with her husband and four children.

The short stories “The Hate” and “Manhunt” are her first published works. Her mystery/thriller Secrets came out in March 2011. The Devil’s Game, a psychological thriller co-written with Maren Kaye, was released in June 2011.

You can find her on facebook and twitter @piercebooks or contact her at slpierce2011@hotmail.com

Load Your Kindle @ the Women’s Literary Cafe!

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